News

WHAT IS THE FUTURE NOW FOR QUALITY ARCHITECTURE, DESIGN & ART IN HOSPITALS?

1 July 2010

The following extracts have been taken from a recent report on BBC2’s The Culture Show. In the current financial crisis there is little optimism to be found for the future. So here is a little ray of sunshine for all who are involved in the development and improvement of healthcare environments. Personally we have come through two recessions and we plan to make it three! Quality design doesn’t have to cost the earth and we aim to continue creating bright, modern displays, portraying the proud history and heritage of our hospitals and the communities they serve. We know that Britain’s dogged spirit and the courage of the people has always shone through in times of hardship – and that shows clearly on all the history displays we have worked on for hospitals. So take heart and battle on!

The Culture Show – BBC 2, Thursday 3rd June 2010. Reporter, Tom Dyckhoff

This report features award winning new hospital architecture, hospital art and their impact on the health of patients. The main focus is CircleBath by Foster & Partners, but also features Stobhill Hospital in Glasgow, Kentish Town Health Centre and The Evelina Children’s Hospital at St Thomas’s in London, by Hopkins Architects.

Dyckhoff about CircleBath, …. “it looks like a cool boutique hotel littered with art….. this isn’t just a hospital, it’s an art gallery, but it’s not just there to look pretty, it’s there to make you relax, and once you relax you get better quicker”.

“There are no signs, a deliberate ploy ….. afterall it just takes the sight of the sign, ‘Oncology’, to make you nervous”.

“It’s easy to forget that this is a functioning hospital. But attention to design detail can make a crucial difference to the lives of patients. Research consistently shows that a positive environment during treatment lowers stress levels, lowers heart rates, which in turn lessens bleeding during operations, and can also cut back the amount of drugs required during recovery.”

Patient replies ….. “ You don’t feel as if you are in a hospital. It just sets you at ease as soon as you walk in the door.”

Dyckhoff continues ….. “new hospitals like Stop Hill Hospital in Glasgow and the Kentish Town Health centre are winning patient praise as well as architectural awards.

Quotes:

“This hospital cost no more than a standard NHS hospital” Spencer de Grey CBE, Head of Design, Foster & Partners, talking about Circle Bath.

“As the Ancient Greeks used to say, you can’t enjoy good health in a bad building” Andrew Graham-Dixon, concludes at the end of the report.

MAKING HEALING AN ART FORM AT JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN MIDDLESBROUGH

3 November 2009

The healing arts project aims to promote health, healing and a sense of wellbeing for the community through the use of arts and the environment. It stemmed from South Tees Hospital NHS Trust’s belief that the effective delivery of the healthcare does not simply begin and end with clinical treatment but rather by adopting a holistic approach to patient care. Shown above is ‘Of Sea and Stars’ by Laura Johnston created using dichroic glass panels.

Research has shown the thoughtful use of colours, lights, art, texture and performing arts in hospitals can aid a person’s recovery, and create a lasting impression to everyone who visits and works there.

A number of artists have undertaken commissions at The James Cook University Hospital based on the theme of Captain Cook including ‘Cooks Earth’ by Andrew Burton, shown above alongside Woodgate Designs ‘North Riding Infirmary Heritage Mural’. As new developments come along careful attention to the environment and the inclusion of art is an integral part of the planning process.

Up to date we have completed 3 murals that sit alongside the other fantastic artworks at the James Cook. These include murals for ‘The First Cottage Hospital’, ‘North Riding Infirmary’ and ‘Middlesbrough General Hospital’.