News

HM YOUNG OFFENDERS INSTITUTION – POSTERS TO GET THE MESSAGE ACROSS

5 November 2009

When young 15-21 year old males, are first admitted to a young offenders institution they often feel afraid and intimidated. Some are illiterate and some have never visited a doctor before in their lives. Attention grabbing, thought provoking, but self-explanatory displays were needed in the health centre at the Wetherby Young Offenders Institution in West Yorkshire, to give these young men the confidence and reassurance to seek help if unsure about any of the health issues raised.

There are various rooms at the health centre, each specialising in separate health issues. Each area required wall displays to explain in a simple, direct and visual way what services are available. We designed 11 displays altogether to resemble film or modern culture posters that youngsters might have on their own bedroom walls at home – this is why we employed not just one style of illustration but a variety.

These are high quality photographic, fade resistant prints, reverse mounted onto tough and durable polycarbonate, providing a permanent display that is both attractive and challenging. Unfortunately we cannot show you how the displays look at Wetherby Young Offenders due to the high level of security, so this is just a mock-up.

JOSIE ASTON – FREELANCE ARTS COORDINATOR

5 November 2009

We first encountered Josie while she was working for one of our clients, Tonic, the arts programme at Leeds Teaching Hospitals. Some years later she contacted us while running a hospital arts programme: ‘ArtsEnhance’ in Bromley, Kent. A new LIFT building, the Beckenham Beacon, was being constructed in the borough – a health ‘one stop shop’. Local residents were pleased to have the new facilities but sad that the name “Beckenham Hospital” would be dropped, as their local hospital had been significant, particularly when the area was bombed heavily during the Second World War.

Josie set up a history group with help from the curator at the local museum, and a radiologist on the hospital staff who kept an archive of local historical material. Current and retired staff contributed, as did members of the public and ArtsEnhance’s volunteers. Josie also obtained funding for the panels from various donations.

We have since also worked with Josie on the Canadian Hospital mural in Orpington, Kent that is to be unveiled in time for Poppy Day 2009.

SKANSKA AND KING’S MILL HOSPITAL – INTEGRATING AND COMPLEMENTING THE ARCHITECTURE

4 November 2009

Some architects and interior designers are very protective of the environments they design and certainly do not want the clean lines of their designs cluttering with other ‘stuff’. But art is very much an integral part of making hospitals more friendly environments to be in. Our aim is to create displays that are bright, modern and attractive that appeal to a wide audience across all age groups, displays that integrate and complement the architecture.

New hospitals create bright new state-of-the-art environments at the very heart of the community. However the planning process is often dogged by protests against the closure of the old hospital. Negative stories start at the beginning of the cycle when typically, a cherished, but crumbling, old hospital is going to be demolished – all that heritage, their hard work, their history will be lost forever, they say. That’s why we have a lot to offer when it comes to reassuring people that their old hospital will be celebrated in the new one – buildings, staff, patients and communities alike.

At King’s Mill Hospital in Nottinghamshire we designed 6 murals and 10 giant banners, that hang above the murals, that are displayed along the entire length of the new King’s Treatment Centre. The KTC ‘street’ links the whole of the new hospital and with 9m high walls and an opaque domed roof structure, provide plenty of natural light for the dramatic large scale artwork.

BBH AWARDS 2009 SHORTLIST – BEST USE OF VISUAL ART IN HEALTHCARE

4 November 2009

The History and Heritage Project at the King’s Mill Hospital, Nottinghamshire, has been shortlisted for Best Use of Visual Art in Healthcare at the BBH 2009 Awards. As stated on the BBH website, ‘Each of the shortlisted entrants has met tough criteria to make it through to the final stage of judging, and fought off competition from a record 156 entries.’

We are delighted that all our hard work and that of the hospital heritage committee has been recognised in this way. Winners will be announced at the Building Better Healthcare Awards ceremony in November 2009 at The Brewery, London. We will keep you informed!

MAKING HEALING AN ART FORM AT JAMES COOK UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL IN MIDDLESBROUGH

3 November 2009

The healing arts project aims to promote health, healing and a sense of wellbeing for the community through the use of arts and the environment. It stemmed from South Tees Hospital NHS Trust’s belief that the effective delivery of the healthcare does not simply begin and end with clinical treatment but rather by adopting a holistic approach to patient care. Shown above is ‘Of Sea and Stars’ by Laura Johnston created using dichroic glass panels.

Research has shown the thoughtful use of colours, lights, art, texture and performing arts in hospitals can aid a person’s recovery, and create a lasting impression to everyone who visits and works there.

A number of artists have undertaken commissions at The James Cook University Hospital based on the theme of Captain Cook including ‘Cooks Earth’ by Andrew Burton, shown above alongside Woodgate Designs ‘North Riding Infirmary Heritage Mural’. As new developments come along careful attention to the environment and the inclusion of art is an integral part of the planning process.

Up to date we have completed 3 murals that sit alongside the other fantastic artworks at the James Cook. These include murals for ‘The First Cottage Hospital’, ‘North Riding Infirmary’ and ‘Middlesbrough General Hospital’.